Kim Huat Tries to Run for President

Kim Huat Tries to Run for President

Official Summary From Authorities

The following has been circulated in social media to explain things about the imam saga. Needless to say, it comes somewhere from some particular statutory board/s, they say…


#Sg #singapore #singapura #thelioncity #littlereddot

Official Summary From Authorities

Trump Supporters React to Amos Yee

Trump supporters welcome Amos Yee with open arms, finds out what he said, doesn’t want him anymore
Thet Nyi Nyi
28 March 2017

Amos Yee was recently granted asylum in America.

This has prompted comments from all quarters, including a passive-aggressive statement from the Ministry of Home Affairs.

Well, one subsection of America that seemed genuinely happy to see Amos Yee in the land of the free is the subreddit, The Donald, which comprises some of President Donald Trump’s most fervent supporters.

They are also quite anti-refugee, specifically refugees from countries that Trump is pushing to put on the travel ban list.

With that in mind, a post claiming “What An Actual Refugee Looks Like” got upvoted to the top of The Donald, getting thousands of upvotes.


FYI, according to them, this is what a refugee looks like


The general consensus on the thread was that Yee shouldn’t have been persecuted for criticising Islam.


And they were glad he was out of Singapore.


Which is apparently super liberal!


Now, fervent Amos Yee scholars would realise that Islam is by no means the only religion he criticised.

The thing is, most of The Donald didn’t.

Until someone pointed out Yee’s impressive bibliography of insults.


On the same day, after the initial hoopla, another post trying to clarify the situation was put up.


Apparently, Yee had badmouthed Christianity too, among his other crusades.

Which, for some reason, changed everything.


Not all free speech is worth listening to.

Go to the original article on to see the screenshots for yourself.

#Sg #singapore #singapura #thelioncity #littlereddot

Trump Supporters React to Amos Yee

The Imam Issue: A Look at the Singapore Muslim Community

The Online Citizen
The Singapore Muslim Community and the Imam Issue
Kamaludeen Mohamed Nasir
6 March 2017

It is well-known that Singapore is a multi-religious society. The 2014 report by Pew named our city-state as the most religiously diverse among the 232 countries studied. What is assumed in this discourse is that all religions are the same and subjected to similar state-society relations.

The fact is, Islam is the most regulated religion in our tiny island and this has been the case for decades. From the appointment of a Minister-in-Charge of Muslim Affairs, to the creation of a statutory board called the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS) where the Mufti is located, and to the Administration of Muslim Law Act that has regulatory powers over local mosques and madrasahs (Islamic schools), there is no doubt that Islam is given a unique attention by the state.

A stark under-appreciation of this social reality, especially among the non-Muslims, is apparent to me in the decade or so that I have been teaching in our local universities. I have always asked my students, that if all the Churches were made to say the exact same thing for their Sunday service with a text provided by an office of a statutory board, how would the Christian community react? The students could not even begin to imagine this! Will this then breed mistrust among the Christian community? This is but just one issue besieging the Muslim populace in Singapore.

When I had coffee with a top local social scientist of NUS a couple of weeks back, we agreed that Islam is the most hierarchical and bureaucratized religion in Singapore. Failure to understand how Islam is managed leads to a failure in understanding the reaction of its local adherents.

This distrust of the Muslim religious elites amidst the disciplining of Islam, from prescribed texts for the weekly Friday prayer sermons, to appointed instructors to “upgrade Islam” through the Asatizah Recognition Scheme that makes it mandatory for every religious teacher to be registered (even those teaching Qur’anic reading in the local neighbourhoods), impact heavily on the religious elites. Many scholars have called this age as one characterised by a crisis of religious authority. The situation can be especially dire in our local Muslim community, given the unique structures bearing upon them.

Distrust breeds distrust. It is not that Singaporean Muslims are predisposed towards being rude or as the Minister of Law put it, “kurang ajar”, towards the state-endorsed religious authority. It is the structures that have been put in place that create such an environment.

The recent issue regarding the police report made against an Imam for making alleged “incendiary” supplications against Christians and Jews that are outside the MUIS-endorsed text cannot be disentangled from the issue of the autonomy of the Muslim clerics. I have engaged the local religious elites numerous times over the last few years and have rarely met a group that is more in fear. The culture of fear among the religious class is often talked about and in one of the engagements that I had with a group of religious elites, one of them candidly lamented, “We are directed and scripted.”

It has often been mentioned that attitude reflects leadership. The angry reaction of the Muslim community in light of the Imam issue should be seen against this backdrop. The absence of the voices of the religious elites in the initial stages of the debacle created a void in the community who then went online to make sense of the matter.

Last week, Assoc Prof Khairudin Aljunied was singled out in parliament for encouraging the “vilification” of the whistle-blower, Terence Nunis. The fact is that hundreds of Muslims had begun pitching in their views on various platforms after Nunis’ pronouncements on Facebook. This was substantiated in a belated statement by the Minister-in-Charge of Muslim Affairs, Assoc Prof Yaacob Ibrahim, who mentioned that the video uploaded by Nunis had indeed “sparked a storm” and “generated many emotions both online and offline. Many in our community felt angry, because they believe that the postings could be used to cast aspersions on Islam and the asatizah in our Mosques”.

It is interesting to note that both Assoc Prof Khairudin and the Mufti appropriated a satirical and poetic style respectively, as means of social critique. However, it has been well-documented that the Singaporean brand of criticism is often manifested through humour, satire and poetics as seen in Talkingcock, Mr Brown, Yawning Bread, Jack Neo’s films and the like. Indirect criticism is characteristic of societies living under soft-authoritarian rule.

There are no differences in opinion that if the allegations against the Imam are proven to be true, his incitement has no place in our multi-religious society. But if it is not – and many among the Muslim community have come to this conclusion upon the explanations provided by numerous local religious scholars who have later gone public in discussing the meaning and context of the supplication – then sadly, the Muslim community will see this as yet another example of disciplining and an attempt to emasculate the local religious fraternity despite the state’s paradoxical pleas for Singaporean Muslims to give the local religious scholars their ears.

It remains to be seen in the aftermath of the Imam episode if the state would choose to go down the path of imposing further restrictions to ensure that the MUIS-endorsed texts be read to the letter, curtailing any creative license of preachers and punishing any dissent towards state-appointed authority. The more enlightened way must be to empower the religious scholars in the field and to give them ownership over their areas of expertise to prevent religious discourse from being co-opted, hijacked and subjected to ad hominem attacks.

The coming forward of a good number of religious elites, including its umbrella body, Singapore Islamic Scholars & Religious Teachers Association (PERGAS), with regard to this Imam issue is a good development that needs to be applauded. The social media provides a ready platform for this. These attempts to speak truth to power should also be captured in the mainstream media. PERGAS’ need to again clarify their position after feeling that they were misrepresented in the Malay mainstream media regarding their statement towards Assoc Prof Khairudin is not a good sign. The perception that the Malay mainstream media is not balanced and selective in their reporting has also led many to turn to the cyber-sphere to air their perspectives.

In fostering this development of active citizenship, we need to keep an eye on encouraging diversity and not just promoting those with a certain kind of thinking that the state can easily manage. This is in line with what the PM had recently mentioned in his interview on February 24th in Today newspaper under the title, “Leaders must be able to take criticism, acknowledge mistakes”. Only then can we move forward as a nation.

#Sg #singapore #singapura #thelioncity #littlereddot

The Imam Issue: A Look at the Singapore Muslim Community

Nicole Seah Now

The following article is taken from Must Share News.

Nicole Seah, the youngest politician at the 2011 elections

Nicole Rebecca Seah was Singapore’s youngest politician at the eventful 2011 General Elections, aged just 24 then. She contested the Marine Parade GRC under the National Solidarity Party (NSP). Seah resigned from the NSP on 25 August 2014 but stated that “For myself, this is not a complete departure from politics.”

So where is Nicole Seah now? She is…

1. …in Thailand

Seah moved to Thailand in 2014 to work at the Bangkok office of advertising firm IPG Mediabrands. She is the daughter of IPG Mediabrands Singapore boss, Pat Lim.

2. …acting

From politician to actress; Nicole makes her acting debut in local film 1965.

3. …laughing at her victory over mainstream media

Seah was enraged when inaccurate news reports about her dating a married man began circulating online. Turns out the man was divorced, but definitely not married at the time. The furore that ensued forced Wanbao and AsiaOne to remove any mention of “married man” in their articles.

4. …a panel speaker

In 2011, she spoke at the Post-General Election Dialogue at NUSS.

In 2012, she spoke at ‘The Young Guns Forum’ organised by the NUS Political Association.

In 2014, she spoke at a forum on The Role of Public Intellectuals, where she commented that Singapore was known for being “risk averse”.

5. …an esteemed speaker

Nicole Seah was a speaker at Women in the Community, a conference organised by the Singapore Management University (SMU) and the Shirin Fozdar Program.

She was also a Visiting Speaker at Yale-NUS, Singapore’s first ever liberal arts college.

Pretty impressive for someone who hasn’t even turned 30 right?

6. …reflecting on her political career

Nicole Seah had a rather personal interview with Her World in 2014.

In the interview, Nicole lets loose about how getting into politics at such a young age affected her, especially with some of the disparaging comments she received from skeptics. And not forgetting the “death and rape threats” too.

7. …an Outstanding NUS alumnus

She received the award in 2012. *clap*

8. …a kid’s dream

The Macpherson Tuition P roject was a volunteer initiative that Seah herself founded in May 2011.

9. …a cat lover

Nicole is also a volunteer at the LoveKuching Project. She also moonlights as a Bangkok travel guru, it seems.

And finally…

Nicole hasn’t been updating her Facebook page for quite some time. Her last update was on 28 January 2015. However, we stumbled upon a post that reminded us of why Singapore once so loved and respected this young politician.

We cri everytiem.

Taken from

#Sg #Singapore #GE2011 #GE2015

Nicole Seah Now